Read time: 4 min. 

Have you ever seen a high level executive give a presentation to the entire company or conference audience using really bad (average) slides? Most people have either witnessed it or been guilty of it. Even though it can be easy to fix, it is unfortunately still the norm.

A friend of mine recently shared a story with me about just this scenario. His CEO gave a presentation to the entire company using poor slides. They were chock-full of bulleted sentences, each one read out loud personally by the Chief Executive Officer himself. The reaction from the audience was Read more →

Read time: 3½ min.

I've been involved in helping others develop presentations for several years now. One thing I see over and over is the reluctance from presenters to follow one simple rule. One that would completely transform their presentation from an ineffective data dump into one that could make a meaningful and valuable impact on all involved.

That one rule is... Read more →

Read time: 3 min.

Have you ever sat down at the computer to work on a slide presentation or anything else that takes complex planning, then hours later find yourself feeling frustrated, like you were spinning your wheels?

Well, I've been there before, too often. Then, a few years ago, my aunt gave me some simple advice which has become one of my favorite PowerPoint presentation tips.

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Read time: 4 min. 

In a previous article we talked about one rule presenters seem reluctant to follow; you can read that post here first. There is also a second vital rule I’ve seen presenters neglect over and over. It causes them to get off target, waste time, and end up with less than stellar results. The rule is what I like to call "the Crystal Rule.” Read more →

Read time: 3 min.

Over the past several years, there has been a movement to improve how presenters create their slides, and there’s a need for the movement still (that’s why I am here).

But sometimes, when there is a problem to solve, the proposed solutions can lead us to the opposite extreme. When that happens, there is still a problem, but now it’s just on the other side. Read more →

Read time: 3 min.

I was coaching a subject-matter expert a while back on preparing for a PowerPoint presentation. We'll call him Carl. I knew Carl hated presenting to an audience, so I gave him several suggestions on how to make the whole process easier and less scary. His comment that he didn't like to prepare too much or write out his speaker notes caused me concern. He said "I don't want to sound too rehearsed, and I know the topic well enough to kind of wing it."
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Read time: 4½ min. Video play time: 8 min. Welcome to this 3-part edition of the BreezeBlog. It's in video format for your viewing pleasure, or you can find the actual written transcript below. Either way, enjoy! Read more →

Read time: 2½ min. Video play time: 4½ min.

Welcome to Part 2 of the 3-part series. In this part we will answer the question we ended with on Part 1 of the series.

If you haven’t read or watched part 1, you’ll definitely want to do that first. Go to Part 1.
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Read time: 2½ min. Video play time: 4½ min.

Welcome to Part 3 of the 3-part series. In this part we will answer the question we ended with on Part 2 of the series.

If you haven’t read Part 1 or 2, you’ll definitely want to do that first. Go to Part 1Go to Part 2. Read more →